Free information & shopping directory
Created by a Mum, Midwife & Childbirth Educator
Home   |   About   |   Disclaimer   |   Advertising

Articles
Sleep
With my second child I wasn't so stressed about getting her to sleep during the night. During her day sleeps I managed to catch up on missed sleep by having a nap at the same time. I hadn't done that with my first child.... I used to run around trying to tidy the house, cook do washing.... all the superwoman stuff.

This section is broken down into the following sub-categories:

Sleep

Click on any of the links below to open in a new browser window:

Sleep
With my second child I wasn't so stressed about getting her to sleep during the night. During her day sleeps I managed to catch up on missed sleep by having a nap at the same time. I hadn't done that with my first child.... I used to run around trying to tidy the house, cook do washing.... all the superwoman stuff. Then get up at night to feed. Of course I crashed after awhile with exhaustion. As a Midwife, I was good at giving advice...you need to look after yourself, don't worry about housework, la- la, but I didn't take onboard doing that myself. Second baby I chilled out a bit and realised that babies do at some stage sleep through the night. My baby was hungry, she wanted fed and that was the bottom line. No need trying to argue with it.

I used to wonder how parents got their babies to sleep through the night at 6 weeks of age. Remember also different people have their own definitions of sleeping through the night, and that there isn't a lot of babies who do sleep through the night at 6 weeks. If you are lucky enough to have a baby who does and you happen to mention it to a parent who a child who still has a child who is waking at night at 10 months don't be surprised if they glare at you.

Research says newborns normally cry a total of 1-4hrs/day usually pre feed and pre nap (for 10 minutes) and often have personal fussy time often late pm. Babies may take up to 10 minutes to settle off to sleep, may grizzle and cry before hand?Newborns sleep approx total of 16-18hrs in 24hrs. Sleep needs decrease over the first year.??

They are waking at night because they need food and because they have not developed circadian rhythm. The circadian rhythm is our internal clock which controls sleep patterns, and it takes time to develop and then change into a long stretch of sleep.

Babies can't talk but they can communicate in other ways. Think about what you do when you are tired.?Signs of being tired include jerky movements, grimaces, grizzling, making fists, yawning, rubbing eyes, staring vacantly into space or crying. ?Signs of wanting a feed include hand to mouth movements, fussiness, sucking action or sounds, cooing or sighing and nuzzling at breast. With your first baby you may take some time to clue into these. You won't be the first parent to think if only they could tell me what they want then rush off to buy some book. Some books can be great, but don't forget to trust in yourself and take time to try and work out what your baby is communicating.

If they are crying think could they be hungry.... when did they last feed? When having a growth spurt (putting on more weight) they can feed often.

Do they have wind? Do they have a dirty nappy? If they cry a lot it could be colic or there may be a medical reason which needs checked out. My son used to be up a lot at night when he had an ear infection or was getting teeth.??

A routine at night can help to settle babies and as they get older they get to know that this is a message that it is bed time. A bath and then massage can be relaxing for them Keeping lights low and reducing the stimulation they get. Again think of yourself it is hard to relax and go off to sleep if there is a lot going on. Most of us need some wind down time before sleep and so do babies.

For more information and support see: http://www.plunket.org.nz/your-child/up-to-6-weeks/?tab=183&#tabbing

Plunket nurses provide support through home and clinic visits, mobile clinics and PlunketLine, a free telephone advice service for parents (0800 933 922, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week)

Back to top
All web sites mentioned above are independent from BabyWebNZ. Thus we cannot take any responsibility for the accuracy of their content.

Please see our Disclaimer.

To have your domain name placed on BabyWebNZ please fill in the Request Listing form and include a short site description (20 words or less), and suggest which page you would like the site added to.

Web Site and its Contents are Copyright © 2004-2008 BabyWebNZ. All Rights Reserved.