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Pregnant up to 10 weeks - what now
Pregnant up to 10 weeks – what now? The pregnancy test instructions say two blue strips means positive, you read on but there is nothing to say what you do now!

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Pregnant up to 10 weeks - what now

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Pregnant up to 10 weeks - what now

BabyWebNZ What Now?

This information is not a substitute for professional midwifery or medical care. You should always seek the advice of your midwife, doctor or health professional for any concerns you may have regarding your health. Information and health practices change with ongoing research, the answers are to the best of our knowledge on the date the question was sent to us.

Pregnancy Information Form

We have added new link "Information Forms" to www.babywebnz.org and www.birthresources.org websites. These forms provide guides to questions you may be asked and topics that will be covered during your pregnancy.

Also there are lists that you can copy and fill out to help with preparing for the birth and care of your child.

Being pregnant or becoming a parent is a whole new world filled with lots of questions, dos and don'ts and conflicting advice. I hope this article with help with some of your questions. http://www.babywebnz.org/display/BabyWebNZ/Articles_Early+Pregnancy

Follow this link http://www.babywebnz.org/display/BabyWebNZ/Survival+Guide_Pregnancy

to find out information on antenatal check and health, discomforts of pregnancy, warning signs and Childbirth education classes.

Childbirth Education Our Wellington based childbirth classes are called BirthResources to complement them and deliver further information, we have set up a BirthResources website www.birthresources.org

packed with useful information for parents and Childbirth Educators.

Subscribe to our BirthResources monthly newsletter or read through previous issues here.

Fetal Development See the video on pregnancy showing a 3D animation on fetal development in the first 9 weeks. It's hard to believe how rapidly one cell evolves in such a short time into the unmistakable body of a baby. Read more: http://www.babycenter.com.au/video/pregnancy/weeks-1-to-9-pregnancy/#ixzz1djvbUn00

Health and screening in pregnancy 

It is important to be looking after your health, with a balance diet, no smoking or drinking alcohol. The ministry of health recommends pregnant woman take a folic acid supplement. Deficiency can cause possible congenital neural tube defects eg spina bifida. Please speak to your LMC (Doctor or Midwife) re this. It is up to you if you want to go see a Doctor or Midwife for early pregnancy care.

At the booking visit, bloods are taken to check rubella immunity, find out your blood group and if you have any antibodies, your hepatitis and HIV status, full blood count (FBC) and a VDRL test for syphilis.

Your maternity health professional will ask you questions when booking you for care with them. It can help with the process to write down some information about yourself and your health, what you want, and any questions you have. This is a guide to possible questions you may be asked.

See http://www.babywebnz.org/display/BabyWebNZ/Information+Forms

You will find the following information on the national screening website. Pregnant women are offered HIV screening and screening for Down syndrome and other conditions. Babies are screened for 28 metabolic disorders (the heel prick test), and for hearing loss. The National Screening Unit website provides the following information: http://www.nsu.govt.nz/current-nsu-programmes/3160.asp

The 0800 MUM 2 BE (0800 686 223) Maternity Consumer phone line is run by the Ministry of Health. See information on the article http://www.birthresources.org/display/BirthResources/Early+Pregnancy

It is recommended to increase your Folic Acid intake before getting pregnant, and in early pregnancy as deficiency can cause possible congenital neural tube defects eg spina bifida. After you realise you are pregnant then you will need to have antenatal (pregnancy) blood tests done this can be done by a Midwife, Doctor or some health clinics. At the booking visit bloods are taken to check rubella immunity, find out your blood group and if you have any antibodies, your hepatitis status, full blood count (FBC) and a VDRL test for syphilis. You will be offered HIV screening also. Women with HIV can have treatment to reduce the chance of the baby getting the virus. Having scans is a personal decision.

See http://www.nsu.govt.nz

From 8 February 2010, there are two screening options available for antenatal screening for Down syndrome and other conditions. Screening for Down syndrome and other conditions is not diagnostic, it just tells you your risk factor. A low risk result means there is very little chance that the baby has any of the conditions screened for. An increased risk result means there is a higher chance that the baby has Down syndrome or another condition. Women with an increased risk result are offered diagnostic testing.

First Trimester Combined Screening combines the results from a blood test taken between 9-13 weeks pregnant) and a nuchal translucency (NT) scan at 11-13 weeks pregnant with other information, such as age and weight, to give one risk result. The blood test is available free of charge. There may be a charge for the NT scan.

Second Trimester Maternal Serum Screening is at 14-18 weeks combines the results from a blood test with other information, such as age and weight, to give a single risk result.

Iodine in pregnancy how much do I take each day? .

Due to an increased need for iodine in pregnancy and breastfeeding, the Ministry recommends that pregnant and breastfeeding women take a registered 150 micrograms (mcg) daily iodine only tablet daily available from 1 July 2010 at pharmacies, as well as eating foods which are important sources of iodine. More information can be found in the pamphlet Folic Acid and Iodine

 The following are links to articles relating to pregnancy:

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